Thursday, November 12, 2009

FOSTER GOIN' TO GRACELAND?

We have long predicted that if Virginia Tech defensive coordinator Bud Foster ever left Blacksburg (and we have doubted all along that he ever would as we believe he is one of the highest paid - not to mention happiest - assistant coaches in the ACC), he'd wind up at what is known in basketball parlance as a "mid-Major."

Enter Memphis.

Recently, Foster said he would be interested in the head coaching opening at the University of Memphis, but has not been contacted by anyone from the university and his name has not surfaced in published reports about possible candidates.

“That might be a job I might be interested in,” Foster said Tuesday when asked for his take on the opening, adding later, “I think there’s a lot of things that are attractive about it.”

Asked what would be attractive about the program, Foster said: “It’s a Conference USA job. You look at teams like Cincinnati, you look at teams like Pittsburgh, you look at teams like Louisville – those three have recently had success that are in urban kind of settings. Memphis is in that same kind of setting and in a pretty decent area from a recruiting standpoint, when you start looking at the athletes they have in that area.”

Foster has a connection to the Tigers’ program. Foster and Memphis’s director of football operations, John Flowers, both attended Nokomis High School in Illinois.

Flowers is in his 25th season as a member of Memphis's coaching staff, serving as the director of football operations for five different head coaches. He said the athletic director or the university’s search committee has never asked him for his input on any coaching searches in the past.

“If they want to ask for an endorsement, I can certainly endorse Bud Foster,” Flowers said. “As far as him coming here, I have not talked to Bud.”

Foster’s name has not been mentioned among possible replacements for Tommy West, who was fired Monday after nine seasons as the coach of the Tigers.

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